Work Permits For Minors

  • Oak Park High School is an issuing agent for Work Permits during the regular school year and summer school. It is a five-step process:

    1. The student obtains the Work Permit Application & completes Section
    2. The employer completes Section
    3. The parent completes Section
    4. The student returns the completed application to the school (the OPHS Counseling Office).
    5. The School verifies that the employer is in compliance with Child Labor Laws and that the student's GPA is above 2.0. If the minor does not attend Oak Park High School they must bring a driver's license or i.d. card with Date of Birth, and a transcript or grade printout from their home school.  If everything is in order the school will issue the work permit generally within 24-48 hours.

    arrow Please note that a work permit is job specific! So, if a student changes jobs they will need to apply for a new permit. Additionally, if a student starts work in the summer and continues to work that same job in the fall (when school resumes), they must re-apply for a new permit since labor laws are different when school is in session.


     

    General Information about minors and employment in the state of California:
    Almost all minors under the age of 18 are subject to California’s child labor protections.  Under the California Labor Code, "minor" is defined as any person under the age of 18 years required to attend school under the provisions of the Education Code, and any person under age six.  "Dropouts" are subject to California’s compulsory education laws, and thus are subject to all state child labor law requirements.  Emancipated minors, while subject to all California’s child labor laws, may apply for a work permit without their parents’ permission.

    Child labor laws: The Division of Labor Standards Enforcement’s child labor law booklet contains comprehensive information about child labor laws, school attendance, wage, hour, and age requirements, restrictions, employer requirements and work permits. The booklet also contains references and links to the state Labor Code, the Education Code and other relevant laws and regulations.

    Work permits:  Except in limited circumstances defined in law and summarized in the child labor law booklet, all minors under 18 years of age employed in the state of California must have a permit to work. Prior to permitting a minor to work, employers must possess a valid permit to employ and work. The permit to employ and work are issued on the same form. A permit to employ and work in industries other than entertainment is usually issued by an authorized person at the minor’s school. During summer months or when school is not in session the work permit is obtained from the superintendent of the school district in which the minor resides.  Typically, after an employer agrees to hire a minor, the minor obtains from his or her school a Department of Education form entitled "Statement of Intent to Employ Minor and Request for Work Permit". The form must be completed by the minor and the employer and signed by the minor’s parent or guardian and the employer. After returning the completed and signed form to the school, school officials may issue the permit to employ and work.  Permits issued during the school year expire five days after the opening of the next succeeding school year and must be renewed.

    Entertainment work permits: Minors aged 15 days to 18 years employed in the entertainment industry must have a permit to work, and employers must have a permit to employ, both permits being issued by the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. These permits are also required for minors making phonographic recordings or who are employed as advertising or photographic models. Permits are required even when the entertainment is non-commercial in nature. There is no fee to obtain an entertainment work permit. The application for permission to work in the entertainment industry must be filled out completely and mailed, along with any required documents and a pre-addressed, stamped envelope, to any office of the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. To find the nearest DLSE office, use the division’s office locatorEmployers intending to employ minors in the entertainment industry must complete the application for permission to work in the entertainment industry and submit it, along with proof of workers’ compensation insurance coverage, to any Division of Labor Standards Enforcement office. To find a DLSE office, use the division’s office locator.

                                                                                                                                                
    Additional information: Employers must follow all relevant health and safety laws to keep young workers safe on the job. Visit Cal/OSHA’s Web site for more information on health and safety laws and regulations in California. Job safety and labor law tips are also available for a variety of industries in English and Spanish on the
     
     
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Last Modified on February 8, 2018